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    SOCIAL STUDIES/HUMANITIES

     

     

    The core of the social studies curriculum is human history.  Studying the choices made by earlier generations can help us understand the present and, perhaps, the future.

     

    1st- 3rd Marking Period

     

    4th Marking Period

    9

    US History 1

     

     

     

    Mini course

    10

    US History 2

     

     

     

    Mini course

    11

    World Cultures

     

     

     

    Mini course

    12

    US Government

                      or

    AP Government & Politics

     

    Mini course

                      or

    AP Government & Politics

     

    (2240) U.S. HISTORY 1

    0.75 credit

     

    Students enrolled in this three marking period long course will be studying early American History, from the Revolution to 1900.  Topics will include the Jefferson and Jackson Administrations, the War of 1812, the Texas War for Independence, the Mexican War and the American Civil War.  Students will choose the topics that are of primary interest to examine in more depth.  Students will take a comprehensive Final Exam at the end of the course.

     (2230) U.S. HISTORY 2

    0.75 credit

     U.S. History 2 is a three marking period long survey course of 20th & 21st century United States history.  This course will consist of 10 Units beginning in 1898 and going to current times.  The following topics will be examined:  The Spanish-American War and Progressivism; WW I and The Roaring 20’s; The Great Depression and New Deal; WW II Home and Abroad; Early Cold War and 1950’s; The Turbulent 60’s; Crisis and Change the 70’s; 80’s and the End of the Cold War; Emergence of Modern America.

     (2220) WORLD CULTURES

    0.75 credit

     This three marking period long course will cover World Cultures, both Western & Non-Western, which will allow the students to look at the broad spheres of human activity including the social, political, scientific, technological, economic, and cultural areas.  Studying the history and inquiring into the families, communities, states, nations, and various people of the world engages the student in the lives, aspirations, struggles, accomplishments and failures of real people.  An appreciation for the diversity of many cultures is just one of the lessons that will be learned in this course.

     (2210) UNITED STATES GOVERNMENT

    0.75 credit

     This three marking period long course includes the study of government theory, federalism in the United States, the structure of the American political system, local taxation, and voting.  Students will also be given the opportunity to register to vote.  An overview of Pennsylvania’s government will also be covered.  This course involves extensive use of the U.S. Constitution and other primary and secondary documents.

     (210) AP US GOVERNMENT & POLITICS

    1.0 credit         (1.07 weight)

    Recommendations:  12th grade status

    Note:  An application process is required for this course.  Students are required to complete a summer assignment.                 Successful completion of this course would fulfill the 12th grade social studies credit requirement

    Teacher:  Mr. Fitzgerald

     This year long college level course utilizes extensive primary & secondary sources.  Extensive reading and writing will be imbedded throughout the course.  Topics to be covered include:  The Constitutional underpinnings of democracy in the U.S., political beliefs and behaviors of individuals in the U.S., political parties and interest groups, the Executive, Legislative & Judicial branches, the bureaucracy, the media and civil liberties and civil rights.  Students are expected to take the AP Government exam.  Students who achieve a designated level on this test may receive college credit.

     Social Studies Electives

     (4057WH) AP WORLD HISTORY

    1.0 credit         (1.07 weight)

    Recommendations:  10th, 11th or 12th grade status.   An application process is required for this course.  Students are required to complete a summer assignment.

    Successful completion of this course would fulfill the 11th grade social studies credit requirement.  If taken after completion of World Cultures, it can be used in place of mini courses as a social studies elective.

    Teacher:  Ms. Durney

     The Advanced Placement World History course content is structured around the investigation of course themes and key concepts in six chronological periods.  The six historical periods, from approximately 8000 B.C.E. to the present, provide a temporal framework for the course.  The instructional importance and assessment weighting for each period varies.  The five course themes are Interaction between Humans and the Environment, Development and Interaction of Cultures, State-Building, Expansion, and Conflict, Creation, Expansion, and Interaction of Economic Systems and Development and Transformation of Social Structures.  By analyzing world history in this manner students will have a better and richer understanding of the world and the cultures within it.  Students are expected to take the AP Exam in May.  Students who achieve a designated level on this test may receive college credit.

     (220) AP US HISTORY

    1.0 credit         (1.07 weight)

    Recommendations:  10th, 11th or 12th grade status.   An application process is required for this course.  Students are required to complete a summer assignment.

    Successful completion of this course would fulfill the 10th grade social studies credit requirement.  If taken after completion of US History 2, it can be used in place of mini courses as a social studies elective.

    Teacher:  Mr. Martin

     AP U.S. History is a year long college level course for students who have excelled in previous U.S. History 1 and U.S. History 2 survey courses.  This course will utilize primary and secondary source reading materials in conjunction with a college level textbook.  Students will be required to present persuasive oral arguments to the class through daily discussions and oral presentations, as well as demonstrate their abilities to conduct research and writing through papers and essays.  The following topics will be covered:  Pre-Columbian America; Colonial North America; The American Revolution; The Early Republic; Antebellum America; Territorial Expansion and Manifest Destiny; Civil War and Reconstruction; Westward Expansion; Industrial America; Populism and Progressivism; Emergence as a World Power; Roaring 20’s; Great Depression and New Deal; WW II Home and Abroad; Early Cold War and 1950’s; The Turbulent 60’s; Crisis and Change the 70’s; 80’s and the End of the Cold War; Emergence of Modern America.  Students in AP courses are expected to take the national AP exam.  Students who achieve a designated level on this test may receive college credit.

      (0215) AP EUROPEAN HISTORY

    1.0 credit         (1.07 weight)

    Recommendations:  10th, 11th or 12th grade status.   An application process is required for this course.  Students are required to complete a summer assignment.

    Teacher:  Mrs. Morris

    The Advanced Placement European History course of study is designed as a college level history course.  Students are expected to demonstrate knowledge of basic chronology and of major events and trends from approximately the 1450’s to the 1990’s; that is, from the High Renaissance to the end of the Cold War and modern times.  The focus of its content is the intellectual-cultural, political-diplomatic, and social-economic history of the above period.  Students’ independent study and research skills are developed and utilized during this course.  Students are expected to take the AP Exam in May. 

     

     (NEW) AP COMPARATIVE GOVERNMENT & POLITICS

    1.0 credit         (1.07 weight)

    Recommendations:  10th, 11th and 12th grade status

    Note:  An application process is required for this course.  Students are required to complete a summer assignment. 

    Teacher:  Mr. Mease

     Comparative Government and Politics introduces students to fundamental concepts used by political scientists to study the processes and outcomes of politics in a variety of country settings.  The course aims to illustrate the rich diversity of political life, to show available institutional alternatives, to explain differences in processes and policy outcomes, and to communicate to students the importance of global political and economic changes.  Careful comparison of political systems produces useful knowledge about the institutions and policies countries have employed to address problems, or, indeed, what they have done to make things worse.  We can compare the effectiveness of policy approaches to poverty or overpopulation by examining how different countries solve similar problems.  Furthermore, by comparing the political institutions and practices of wealthy and poor countries, we can begin to understand the political consequences of economics well-being.  Six countries form the core of the AP Comparative Government and Politics course:  China, Great Britain, Iran, Mexico, Nigeria, and Russia.  Students are expected to take the AP Exam in May.  Students who achieve a designated level on this test may receive college credit.

     

     

    (NEW) AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY

    1.0 credit         (1.07 weight)

    Recommendations:  10th, 11th and 12th grade status

    Note:  An application process is required for this course.  Students are required to complete a summer assignment. 

    Teacher:  

     The purpose of the AP Human Geography course is to introduce students to the systematic study of patterns and processes that have shaped human understanding, use and alteration of Earth’s surface.  Students learn to employ spatial concepts and landscape analysis to examine human socioeconomic organization and its environmental consequences.  They also learn about the methods and tools geographers use in their research and applications.  On successful completion of the course, students should have developed skills that enable them to:

    *Interpret maps and analyze geospatial data

    *Understand and explain the implications of associations and networks among phenomena in places

    *Recognize and interpret the relationships among patterns and processes at different scales of anaylsis

    *Define regions and evaluate the regionalization process

    *Characterize and analyze changing interconnections among places

    Students are expected to take the AP Exam in May.  Students who achieve a designated level on this test may receive college credit.

    (240) AP PSYCHOLOGY

    1.0 credit         (1.07 weight)

    Recommendations:  10th, 11th or 12th grade status.   An application process is required for this course.  Students are required to complete a summer assignment.

    Teacher:  Mrs. Morris

     This year long course is designed to acquaint students with the field of psychology, promote critical thinking skills, develop scientific writing skills and prepare students for the AP Psychology Exam which is administered in May.  We will cover the structure of psychology (what it is), the purpose of psychology (what it does), and the benefits and challenges of psychology in everyday life (how it is applied).  Students are expected to take the AP Psychology exam.  Students who achieve a designated level on this test may receive college credit.

     

     Required Mini-Course Offerings

    (2261) AMERICA AT WAR 2

    0.25 credit

    Teacher:  Mr. Martin

     

    Students enrolled in this class will explore the history of the United States through the chronological events of wars throughout the history of the United States.  The course will begin with World War I.  Next, we will progress into the Second World War.  We will connect future wars with a discussion of the Cold War (even though it wasn’t a war in the physical sense) and proceed into Korean and Vietnam Wars.  Finally, we will finish the course with the post-Cold War era and focus on the Persian Gulf War and the current War on Terrorism.  During the course of these units, we will look at important events leading up to the war, important people, specific battles within the war, key results of the war and long-term effects of the war which impact our history today.  At the same time, if possible, we will make a connection to local history, both in Pennsylvania and Bellefonte history.  Students will have the opportunity to explore aspects of the war which are an interest to them such as medical aspects of the war, strategic plans, transportation, etc.  Course assessments will be through projects, cooperative learning, and unit exams.

     

     

    (04109CW) COLD WAR

    0.25 credit

    Teacher:  Mr. Mease

     

    This course will examine the state of hostility that developed between the United States and the Soviet Union after World War II.  Areas of focus will include military coalitions, espionage, proxy wars, the use of propaganda, the nuclear arms race, rivalry in sports and the space race.

     

     

    (NEW) ECONOMICS

    0.25 credit

    Teacher:  Ms. McClain

     

    People are exposed continuously over their lifetime to a wide variety of economic questions.  The objective of this course is to develop, in students, an ability to understand and make reasoned judgments about major economic questions we face today.  This course will introduce students to both micro and macro- economics.  Students will learn how the American market economy in which we live operates.  The use of Pennsylvania’s unique economic contributions will be included.

     

    Areas of study include:  the importance of economics, trade-offs and opportunities costs, characteristics and goals of the American economy, markets, prices, business competition, supply and demand, business organizations, stocks and bonds, economic statistics, the business cycle, the Federal Reserve System and United States monetary policy.

     

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    (2213) FROM BOOM TO BUST

    0.25 credit

    Teacher:  Mr. Elder

     

    Students enrolled in this course will analyze the boom times of the 1920’s to the bust times of the 1930’s.   Students will be engaged to the historical events surrounding these decades along with the government’s handling of them.

     

     

    (2232) TEENAGE TROUBLES IN AMERICA:  A Sociological Perspective

    0.25 credit

    Teacher:  Mrs. Morris

     

    Sociology is a mini course that studies human society and social behavior.  Positive human relationships are an essential part of a civilized society and how we interact with each other is important so that we can find answers to questions and solve problems in our world.  “Sociology teaches us to look at life in a scientific, systematic way.”  The way that we view the world comes from what we learn in our everyday activities.  “The values, beliefs, lifestyles of those around us, as well as historic events help to mold us into unique individuals who have varied outlooks on social reality.”  This course deals with social atmosphere that helps to make us who we are and how we behave.  Sociology will cover topics such as culture, violence, deviance, social control, socialization and personality, group behavior, social class, and social institutions.  The key component of this course is to study ourselves and the society that influences our behavior.

     

     

    (2220A) WORLD CULTURES-AFRICA/AMERICAS

    0.25 credit

    Teacher:  Mr. Maney

     

    This nine week course explores the culture of African, South, Central and Caribbean American.  This course will be a thematic exploration into some of the important historical problems and cultural aspects of these areas.  This course will follow the ten thematic themes of Social Studies.

     

    Historical Themes to be Utilized:

    ·   Culture

    ·   Time, Continuity and Change

    ·   People, Places and Environment

    ·   Individual Development and Identity

    ·   Individuals, Groups and Institutions

    ·   Power, Authority and Governance

    ·   Production, Distribution and Consumption

    ·   Science, Technology and Society

    ·   Global Connections

    ·   Civic Ideals and Practices

     

     

    (2262) WORLD RELIGIONS

    0.25 credit

    Teacher:   Ms. Durney

     

    Students enrolled in this course will be introduced to the history of world religion.  Students will investigate the history and analyze different religious belief systems, including but not limited to Judaism, Christianity, Islam, Hinduism, Buddhism and Taoism.

      

     

Last Modified on August 30, 2014